eric whelan

This is a wordcloud generated on the last 15 negative tweets sent to a Twitter account I manage. One thing I’ve noticed as a community manager is peoples’ habit of using words such as “shocked” and “appalled” to describe the smallest complaint when clearly they are neither. Exaggeration is (often) the name of the game when complaining through social media.
It’s also interesting to see the large number of people who expect so much from a Twitter or FB account, but don’t even think of speaking to a member of staff during their experience. I agree that social media is amazing for customer services, but when visiting a venue, surely speaking to on-hand staff makes more sense than tweeting and asking for the heating to be turned up? And yes, that’s happened. A lot. View Larger

This is a wordcloud generated on the last 15 negative tweets sent to a Twitter account I manage. One thing I’ve noticed as a community manager is peoples’ habit of using words such as “shocked” and “appalled” to describe the smallest complaint when clearly they are neither. Exaggeration is (often) the name of the game when complaining through social media.

It’s also interesting to see the large number of people who expect so much from a Twitter or FB account, but don’t even think of speaking to a member of staff during their experience. I agree that social media is amazing for customer services, but when visiting a venue, surely speaking to on-hand staff makes more sense than tweeting and asking for the heating to be turned up? And yes, that’s happened. A lot.


When they were (jokingly) attacked on their Facebook page about how their representation of women in their adverts wasn’t realistic, you’d expect a company like Bodyform to give a straightforward response. Bodyform haven’t exactly been held up as a shining example of great social media use, but their response this time was pretty impressive.

Their response was this fantastic video which has now been viewed by over 1 million people in the two days it’s been online and will no doubt go down as one of the best uses of social media by a big organisation this year. And it’s easy to see why.


It’s always annoyed me that Tumblr haven’t released a native iPad app. It seems like a massively missed opportunity for a platform that prides itself on being so focused on mobile and while there are some great Tumblr clients for the iPad, like Tumblita, they don’t make it as easy as they could to flick through the blogs you follow.

So I took to Paper by FiftyThree to sketch out some ideas I have for how a native app might work. It takes its browsing style from Flipboard (easily one of the best iPad apps) and uses the swipe-out menu which is popular at the moment since it’s very user friendly.

There’s still work to be done; more detail is needed on the compose pages, for instance, but I think the changing features in the permanent nav bar at the top of the page, the swipe-out menu and the Flipboard-style display of posts would allow users to seamlessly jump between writing, reading, liking and reblogging posts.


Four apparent Windows 8 adverts have leaked and, if they’re real, it looks absolutely incredible. I’m an iPad user, but I’ll gladly say that the features and navigation of Windows 8 on a touch device put iOS to shame. iOS has seen so little change since it’s first iteration so it’s incredible to see a touch OS that’s been completely designed from the ground up. It’s massively exciting.

This could easily place Microsoft as a serious competitor in the tablet market.


Here's why I'm quiet →

The gaps between my posts here are getting longer and longer but it’s not because I’ve lost interest. I’ve spent the best part of the last year building up the MU blog which I write for work so when I do have blogging time, it tends to go there.

While this blog has mostly been digital media and communications focused, the MU blog also touches on design and technology as well as social and marketing. There’ll always be more here, I promise, but the MU Blog is worth a big fat follow too.